Dead cat

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Motheroftwo

Posts: 2075

Joined: Fri Jan 17, 2003 1:37 pm

Post Fri Oct 15, 2004 1:04 pm

Dead cat

Well, the silence has ended. This morning I nearly tripped over a dead cat that had been left on my doormat. It happened early this morning, 6:15-6:45 AM.

Obviously the freak has knocked another screw loose, and this one may have been one of the last that was holding his heart in his chest. Who could do such a thing? It sounds like something out of a horror movie, not something out of my life.

What gets me is I remember now, he told me that as a child at Halloween the kids in his neighborhood used to catch cats and stick bottle rockes up their butts. When he saw the horrified look on my face he assured me that he never did it, but I'll bet he was the ring leader, or maybe the sole perp.
Mother of two
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paranoid

Posts: 1915

Joined: Tue Oct 14, 2003 1:03 pm

Location: in the library

Post Fri Oct 15, 2004 5:38 pm

Wow. And I was bummed about my sighting. Sorry.

Too bad they can't get fingeprints off cats. Only on TV....
Virginal Cindy the upright and stalwart
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sur5er31198

Posts: 1090

Joined: Wed Jun 30, 2004 9:45 pm

Location: hopefully a few steps ahead of my stalker

Post Fri Oct 15, 2004 8:03 pm

MOT,

So sorry that you were met with such a gruesome sight this morning....that is just plain sick. Strange, but this past weekend, I was talking with a friend of mine, a police officer, and we were talking about psychopaths and how they can trace their behavior back to childhood. The number one red flag? You got it, cruelty to animals.

Geeeeeeze, some men leave flowers, your's :roll: leaves dead animals.
An informed victim is an empowered victim enroute to recovery.
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Motheroftwo

Posts: 2075

Joined: Fri Jan 17, 2003 1:37 pm

Post Fri Oct 15, 2004 10:08 pm

Well hopefully he's got something up HIS butt tonight. The DV detective that handled the RO violations during the divorce, he called this afternoon. Apparently someone took it seriously and they picked him up. They can't charge him for the cat, but he's got several warrants, as usual, so he'll be out of commission for a few days.

What worries me is that this is an extreme escalation. He isn't watching from afar, he isn't calling. He's walking up to my front door. Not to mention that he killed a cat.
Mother of two
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sur5er31198

Posts: 1090

Joined: Wed Jun 30, 2004 9:45 pm

Location: hopefully a few steps ahead of my stalker

Post Fri Oct 15, 2004 10:15 pm

MOT,

Great to hear that your ex is sitting in jail this weekend. Call booking and find out when his preliminary hearing is....when they will read him the charges and he will plea. You can request, due to his stalking and the dead cat, that he be bound over in jail pending his hearing for revocation. I would definately mention the cat to the DA and judge: 1. As you stated, he was so close to your house that he was actually on the front porch...scary....and what was the message behind the dead cat...'you're next?'; 2. I am assuming that the cat was killed and then placed on your step...bring this up...how sick of someone not only to kill an animal, but to go to the pains of transporting a dead animal to your front step...who else would do something like that?

Hurrah for the detective that is taking this seriously! :wink:

Paranoid: all my text books are in the basement....can you look up psychopath and animal abuse for us? Thank ya.
An informed victim is an empowered victim enroute to recovery.
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sur5er31198

Posts: 1090

Joined: Wed Jun 30, 2004 9:45 pm

Location: hopefully a few steps ahead of my stalker

Post Fri Oct 15, 2004 11:06 pm

MOT,

Here's something similar to what we were talking about this weekend...I have such great conversations with friends. :roll:

http://www.internationalstafford.com/ma ... 01_15.html

From: "David Levy" <dlevy@ashford-middx.freeserve.co.uk>
To: "Helen Park" <mooch@hapworks.com>

Subject: A very interesting article

Date: Fri, 27 Apr 2001 22:29:19 +0100

X-Priority: 3

Status:



Proposed law would make pet abuse a felony

Josephine Marcotty / Star Tribune

Rachel Bandy has spent most of her career fighting family violence, first as a police officer and now as head of Minnesota's domestic-and sexual-violence program.

But recently she appeared before a legislative panel in support of a bill that raises the penalties for violence against another family member -- the pet dog or cat.

Violence against pets is "a huge red flag that someone is ready to graduate to human abuse," said Bandy, director of the state Department of Public Safety's division of domestic violence and sexual assault.
The bill reflects the growing recognition that anyone who tortures an animal "has something wrong with them that needs to be addressed," said Robert Lockwood of the Humane Society of the United States.
Pet and animal torture is also frequently seen in the early behaviors of rapists and serial killers, and is a common thread in the histories of many teenagers convicted in school shootings as well. It is one of the three factors the FBI looks for in the childhood histories of psychopaths. The others are fire-setting and bed-wetting.
Pet abuse of any kind in Minnesota now is only a misdemeanor, regardless of how appalling, with a maximum sentence of 90 days in jail and a $1,000 fine. That means, said supporters of the bill, that crimes against animals often go unreported or aren't prosecuted.

The Senate overwhelmingly passed the bill last week, and the House is expected to vote soon. It's similar to laws on the books in 34 states. If passed, it would make intentional torture of a pet or companion animal, such as a seeing-eye dog, a felony that carries a maximum penalty of up to four years in prison, a fine of up to $10,000, or both. But most important to many who work with violent adults is the option the law would give to judges to impose counseling and psychological assessment.

"To the extent that we can stop the escalation of violence, this is a good piece of legislation," said John Kingrey, executive director of the Minnesota County Attorneys Association. "It's a proactive piece of legislation."

Broad-based support

Nancy Minion, a supporter of the bill and founder of Second Chance Animal Refuge, said it's taken the animal-protection and other groups five years to get the law this far in the legislative process. It's been thwarted in past sessions by hunting and agriculture groups fearful that a law would restrict accepted hunting and agricultural practices.

So this year the bill addresses only pets and assistance dogs, not animals in general, and there has been little opposition. The law would not cover livestock, game animals or even wild animals that have been adopted as pets, because that isn't legal anyway, Minion said. Nor would it cover animals slaughtered as part of religious ceremonies, she said.

That means, for example, that farmers can still castrate livestock without pain medication, Orthodox Jews can slaughter livestock by bleeding them to death, and hunters can shoot deer and not be subject to any penalties, supporters said.

"Anything that is lawful now is still lawful under the bill," she said.

Yet, clearly society is of two minds when it comes to treatment of animals, said Lockwood, who is vice president of research and education for the Humane Society of the United States. But the focus of the Minnesota bill and others like it is "the intentional cruelty and intentional infliction of pain, behavior that is clearly at odds with what civilized society expects and is willing to tolerate," he said.

Based on past history, there might be as many as 12 pet-abuse cases a year in Minnesota severe enough to be charged as felonies, said Keith Streff, an investigator for the Humane Society of Minnesota who has worked on behalf of the bill. Although such cases are rare, photographs that document those he's investigated show stunning acts of cruelty.

A man bludgeoned his neighbor's dog to death -- while the owner watched -- because it had defecated on the neighbor's property, Streff said. A puppy's throat was partly slit in a failed euthanasia attempt. Other pictures showed the frozen, starved carcasses of dogs tied to a back porch and a horse that was dragged at high speed behind a truck because the owner thought it was too slow.

He also tells of phone calls he gets from abused women describing how their boyfriends or husbands have killed and buried the family cat or dog. But under current statutes, there's not much that law-enforcement officers can do about violence against pets, he said.

"It gets back to the old cliche -- there ought to be a law," he said.

In some situations, the intended victim is the animal. That is particularly true in cases in which children or teenagers abuse animals. However, said experts, that's because the kids themselves are often victims of adult abuse of some kind.

"Show me a kid who is harming an animal, I'll show you a kid that is probably being harmed," said Mic Hunter, a St. Paul psychologist and family therapist.

Pets in the crossfire

In domestic abuse, however, even though an animal may get hurt, the intended victim is usually a family member, experts said. The threat to the pet is often used as leverage.

"If you put a person's child or pet in harm's way, you can pretty much get whatever you want out of them," Bandy said.

That emotional ties to pets can be leveraged to such an extent reveal how strong they can be. The proposed bill in a sense legitimizes that bond, experts said, and shows how pets can affect people's lives.

Hunter described the case of a woman who had grown up in a violent and sexually abusive family, and who could not develop intimate or trusting relationships as a result.

"She had no idea that there were people who didn't" abuse others, he said. "I invited her to get a pet so she could learn to bond with it."

She found a cat and grew very attached to it, he said. She even allowed it to sleep in her bedroom with her. It was the first time she'd ever had someone in her bedroom who was not a sexual abuser, he said.

When her boyfriend hit her, Hunter asked her how she would feel if he had done it to her cat. She said she might feel like killing him, Hunter said.

One day the boyfriend lifted up the cat and threatened to throw it across the room, Hunter said, and that was all it took -- the woman left him.

-- Josephine Marcotty is at <mailto:marcotty@startribune.com>marcotty@startribune.com .The pet abuse bill is posted on the Minnesota House Web site, <http://www.house.leg.state.mn.us>http://www.house.leg.state.mn.us.
An informed victim is an empowered victim enroute to recovery.
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Motheroftwo

Posts: 2075

Joined: Fri Jan 17, 2003 1:37 pm

Post Sat Oct 16, 2004 11:37 am

That's just it, there IS something wrong with him that needs to be addressed. I hope that the legal system can see that.
Mother of two
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sur5er31198

Posts: 1090

Joined: Wed Jun 30, 2004 9:45 pm

Location: hopefully a few steps ahead of my stalker

Post Sat Oct 16, 2004 11:47 am

MOT,

I hope the CJ in your area does see your ex's killing of this cat as a symptom of a major sickness and it is addressed. From your post, it looks as though you have one sharp detective on the case, who is going to insure that your ex's mental illness is addressed. :wink:

It makes me shudder when I hear of an animal being abused/tortured/killed by some sick bastard. That is just sick, sick, sick!

Hubby and I rescued a puppy that had been abused....so this subject hits my heart deep. Also, I remember Butthead beating the crap out of our german sheppard...the deranged look in his eyes and his inability to feel the pain he was inflicting on the poor dog...it makes me sick to my stomach just to recall it. And to think that these sickos get some type of power high from inflicting pain/death on a poor defenseless animal.

I hope your sicko ex rots in jail for what he has put you through and for what he did to that cat.
:roll:
An informed victim is an empowered victim enroute to recovery.
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halcion69

Posts: 171

Joined: Mon Aug 09, 2004 1:00 pm

Post Sat Oct 16, 2004 5:08 pm

Sorry MOT. I'm glad the detective is taking this seriously. I hope that sicko is put away for a while.

I hope things settle down for you.
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Motheroftwo

Posts: 2075

Joined: Fri Jan 17, 2003 1:37 pm

Post Mon Oct 18, 2004 7:58 am

I hope so too. I am thinking of moving and not giving the freak my new address. He could take me to court for contempt, but I don't think he'll try that. He hasn't so far.

Of course, in order for that to be effective I'd have to change jobs at the same time, so he couldn't follow me home from work.
Mother of two
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Monolith

Posts: 111

Joined: Sun Aug 17, 2003 8:22 pm

Location: Middle Of Somewhere

Post Mon Oct 18, 2004 9:24 am

Moving and not giving our asshat the new address is how we got into the situation where he filed for a show cause.

It all depends on your particular idiot. If you are sure he won't file, it's a good idea.

Then again, choosing between being safe and taking the chance on a filing was an easy choice for us. We hid for a few months.

Stay safe, MOT. Being alive and having a few court dates is preferable to running into the freak.
Whatever tears one may shed, in the end one always blows one's nose.
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Motheroftwo

Posts: 2075

Joined: Fri Jan 17, 2003 1:37 pm

Post Mon Oct 18, 2004 10:11 am

Its always a gamble, weighing the risk to my personal safety against the worst thing that I can imagine: losing custody to the freak because I didn't follow out parenting plan. I've covered my ass with letters to the freak explaining why I deny visitation, why I don't take his calls, etc. If I move and refuse to give him my forwarding address, I'll just write one more cover my ass letter. Then if he chooses to take me to court he can explain the dead cat to the judge.

He won't file anything, though, because he's afraid of court.
Mother of two

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